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Decision makers: Pune Municipal Corporation and State Public Works Department 


Pune is going to lose 59 trees for a proposed ‘Oxygen Park.’ Ironic? We think so too.


The proposed park project is planned across 7.5 acres of land with a joggers’ track, parking lot, security room, hawkers’ zone, washrooms, etc. This park project and its exorbitant infrastructure come at the cost of Pune’s natural green cover. As per the locals and resident groups, “Kharadi has turned into a concrete jungle because of indiscriminate tree-cutting allowed by the PMC.” 


Based on reports by Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC), the trees marked to be massacred include 21 tamarind trees, five cherry trees, three neem trees, and five babul trees amongst other prominent species. Aged between four and twenty-five years, the trees stand 4-11 feet tall, enriching Pune’s biodiversity. Additionally, PMC intends to transplant 32 healthy trees from the area to accommodate its extravagant project.  


These trees are an integral part of Pune’s ecosystem and are habitats of numerous species of birds and animals. Furthermore, they form an important part of Pune’s landscape and contribute to the city’s aesthetic heritage. 


As per the Maharashtra (Urban Areas) Preservation of Trees Act, a public notice should be issued for every tree to be felled for any civic project. The public notice must be released in at least one local newspaper stating the purpose of tree-felling and inviting objections from the public. Much as local environmentalists think the due process for tree-cutting is not been followed by PMC, there is no public notice either. 


While it is an unscientific idea to replace the Earth’s natural oxygen providers with a man-made ‘oxygen park,’ the ill-conceived project will prove detrimental to the fast-failing health of our environment. In addition to the environmental consequences, it’ll impact the health of the local community as well. 


Sign the petition and join us in urging Pune's civic authorities to devise sustainable solutions of development instead. Together, we can make a difference. 


Sources:

The Maharashtra (Urban Areas) Preservation of Trees Act, 1975 

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/pune/59-trees-to-be-cut-for-kharadi-oxygen-park/articleshow/99366229.cms?from=mdr 

 https://punemirror.com/pune/civic/pune-59-trees-to-be-cut-for-oxygen-park/cid1681290785.htm


Decision makers: Pune Municipal Corporation and State Public Works Department 


Pune is going to lose 59 trees for a proposed ‘Oxygen Park.’ Ironic? We think so too.


The proposed park project is planned across 7.5 acres of land with a joggers’ track, parking lot, security room, hawkers’ zone, washrooms, etc. This park project and its exorbitant infrastructure come at the cost of Pune’s natural green cover. As per the locals and resident groups, “Kharadi has turned into a concrete jungle because of indiscriminate tree-cutting allowed by the PMC.” 


Based on reports by Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC), the trees marked to be massacred include 21 tamarind trees, five cherry trees, three neem trees, and five babul trees amongst other prominent species. Aged between four and twenty-five years, the trees stand 4-11 feet tall, enriching Pune’s biodiversity. Additionally, PMC intends to transplant 32 healthy trees from the area to accommodate its extravagant project.  


These trees are an integral part of Pune’s ecosystem and are habitats of numerous species of birds and animals. Furthermore, they form an important part of Pune’s landscape and contribute to the city’s aesthetic heritage. 


As per the Maharashtra (Urban Areas) Preservation of Trees Act, a public notice should be issued for every tree to be felled for any civic project. The public notice must be released in at least one local newspaper stating the purpose of tree-felling and inviting objections from the public. Much as local environmentalists think the due process for tree-cutting is not been followed by PMC, there is no public notice either. 


While it is an unscientific idea to replace the Earth’s natural oxygen providers with a man-made ‘oxygen park,’ the ill-conceived project will prove detrimental to the fast-failing health of our environment. In addition to the environmental consequences, it’ll impact the health of the local community as well. 


Sign the petition and join us in urging Pune's civic authorities to devise sustainable solutions of development instead. Together, we can make a difference. 


Sources:

The Maharashtra (Urban Areas) Preservation of Trees Act, 1975 

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/pune/59-trees-to-be-cut-for-kharadi-oxygen-park/articleshow/99366229.cms?from=mdr 

 https://punemirror.com/pune/civic/pune-59-trees-to-be-cut-for-oxygen-park/cid1681290785.htm

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